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INSECTIVORE, TREE SHREW & ELEPHANT SHREW SPECIALIST GROUP


Eurasian Insectivores and Tree Shrews:
Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan
Published 1995


Sorex alpinus| S. araneus | S. asper| S. bedfordiae | S. buchariensis | S. caecutiens | S. camtschatica| S. cansulus | S. coronatus | S. cylindricauda | S. daphaenodon | S. excelsus | S. gracillimus | S. granarius | S. hosonoi | S. isodon | S. kozlovi | S. leucogaster | S. minutissimus | S. minutus | S. mirabilis | S. planiceps | S. portenkoi | S. raddei | S. roboratus | S. sadonis | S. samniticus | S. satunini | S. shinto | S. sinalis | S. thibetanus | S. tundrensis | S. unguiculatus | S. volnuchini


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GENUS SOREX - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

The genus Sorex ('red-toothed shrews') consists of about 70 species which inhabit the northern hemisphere ranging as far south as Central America in the New World, and to Israel, Asia Minor, Kashmir and northern Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam in the Old World. Thirty four species are represented in Eurasia. They frequent moist areas, including forests, shrub-grown tracts and tundra. A few species have adapted to living in arid ecosystems.


Alpine shrew (Sorex alpinus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex alpinus Schinz 1837.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: The alpine shrew is slightly larger than the common shrew Sorex araneus (head and body length 60-75mm) and the tail is as long as the head and body combined (it is the longest of the European shrew species). It is a slate grey colour, only slightly lighter on the ventral surface.

Distribution: Mountains of Central Europe to the Pyrenees (isolated populations) and Balkans. Between 600 and 1500m in the Alps, down to 180m in southern Germany.

Habitat: Montane coniferous forests, especially near water. More strictly montane in the south than in the northern part of its range.

Ecology and behaviour: The ecology of this species in the wild is poorly known (see Spitzbergen, 1990). Throughout its range S. alpinus overlaps both geographically and ecologically with S. araneus, S. minutus and Neomys fodiens.

Sorex alpinus

Although widely distributed, the ecology of the alpine shrew (Sorex alpinus) is poorly known. (Photo by Peter Vogel)



Eurasian common shrew (Sorex araneus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex araneus Linnaeus 1758.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: This species is recognisable by its tricoloured coat: upper parts vary from a medium-brown in juveniles to dark brown in adults, with a pale belly. A distinct band of intermediate colour separates the dark and light sections on each flank. The tail is evenly haired. Head and body length varies from 48-80mm, with tail length ranging from 24-44mm. Weight is 5-14g. The common shrew is noticeably larger than the pygmy shrew (S. minutus), but only distinguishable from S. coronatus and S. granarius by skull measurements and/ or chromosome examinations.

Distribution: Europe, including Great Britain and the Pyrenees, but absent from Iberia, most of France and Ireland. This species overlaps slightly with Millet's shrew (S. coronatus) in a zone from the Netherlands to Switzerland. It extends eastwards as far as Lake Baikal in all but the dry steppe and desert zones.

Habitat: Found in a wide range of habitats including woodlands, grassland, hedgerows, heath, dunes and scree. May live up to the limits of summer snow line.

Ecology and behaviour: Solitary and aggressive. Young disperse shortly after weaning and individuals of both sexes establish their own home ranges. These are largely exclusive to other shrews of the same species, varying in size from 370-630ml. Active during day and night with about 10 periods of almost continuous activity (Churchfield, 199 1). Juveniles are territorial, and breeding is delayed until their second year. Population densities are highly variable but may range from 42-69/ha in deciduous woodland and grassland during summer months (Crowcroft, 1954; Shillito, 1963; Yalden, 1974). Densities are much lower in winter - 5-27/ha (Churchfield, 1991). The Eurasian common shrew makes its own surface runways through the ground vegetation, but may also use the subterranean burrows of mice, voles and moles (Talpa spp.). They are opportunistic feeders, preying on a wide range of insects, spiders, earthworms and woodlice. Main predators are owls, but stoats, weasels, foxes and cats also prey on shrews. This species constitutes about 5% by weight in the diets of tawny owls in woodland (Southern, 1954) and 6-13% in the diet of barn owls (Buckley and Goldsmith, 1975). This species is especially vulnerable during the juvenile period of dispersal.


Tien Shan shrew (Sorex asper) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex asper Thomas 1914.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Moderate-sized shrew: head and body length measures 65mm; tail 37mm. Uniform brown colour in summer; greyer in winter.

Distribution: The Tien Shan shrew has only been recorded from the western Tien Shan mountains, Kygyzstan, and the adjacent part of Xinjiang Province, China.

Lesser stripe-backed shrew (Sorex bedfordiae) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex bedfordiae Thomas 191 1. Three subspecies have been proposed: S.b. fumeolus; S.b. gomphus and S.b. nepalensis.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Nepalese specimens of this shrew are relatively large;head and body length 66-7lmm, tail length 55-57mm, hind foot 13.3-13.7mm. The body size is similar to the greater stripe-backed shrew (Sorex cylindricauda) in China (Abe, pers. comm.), although Hoffmann (1987) reports that S. bedfordiae is smaller than S. cylindricauda in all cranial measurements. S. bedfordiae populations exhibit geographic variation in relative tail length, longer tails being found in the Sichuan population (90-98% of headbody length), where they are potentially sympatric with S. cylindricauda. In Gansu and Yunnan (China) and parts of Myanmar, where S. bedfordiae is the only striped shrew, relative tail length is less, being 83-86% of head-body length (Hoffmann, 1987).

Distribution: This species has been recorded from South Gansu, Sichuan and West Yunnan (China), North Myanmar and Nepal at altitudes of 2100-4400m.

Habitat: Montane forest.

Pamir shrew (Sorex buchariensis) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex buchariensis Ognev 1921. Considered conspecific with S. thibetanus by Dolgov and Hoffmann (1977) and Hoffmann (in press).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: S. buchariensis occurs in the Pamir Mountains, Tadzhikistan and western Tibet.

Laxmann's shrew (Sorex caecutiens) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex caecutiens Laxmann 1788.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: This medium-sized shrew is intermediate in size between S. minutus and S. araneus, measuring 50-70mm, excluding tail. In appearance S. caecutiens is bicoloured, but darker above than S.minutus. In juveniles, the tail is especially well tufted.

Distribution: This species occurs from eastern Europe (Sweden and Poland) to eastern Siberia and south to Mongolia and Korea. Also present on the island of Sakhalin (Hutterer, 1993).

Habitat: Coniferous forest, shrublands and tundra.

Ecology and behaviour: Often found with Sorex unguiculatus in the forests of Hokkaido, they feed on a wide range of insects, spiders and centipedes. Breeding season ranges from June to October; 4-8 young are produced per litter. The maximum life span in the wild may be as much as 17 months, in Hokkaido (Abe, 1967).

Kamchatka shrew (Sorex camtschatica) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex camtschatica Yudin 1972. Formerly assigned to S. cinereus, a North American species by Corbet (1978), but see Hutterer (1993).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: This species occurs only in the southern Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia.

Habitat: Forest and tundra.

Gansu shrew (Sorex cansulus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex cansulus Thomas 1912. Considered conspecific with S. caeutiens by Corbet (1978), but see Hoffmann (1987).

Status & Summary: Critically Endangered (B l and 2c).

Distribution: This species is only known from its type locality in Gansu Province, China.

Millet's shrew (Sorex coronatus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex coronatus Millet 1828.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Similar in appearance, but slightly smaller than S. araneus. Small morphological differences have been identified but the most reliable means of identification is by chromosomal examination (see Churchfield, 1991).

Distribution: Northern Spain to the Netherlands, southwestern Germany, Switzerland, overlapping slightly with S. araneus. Replaces S. araneus on Jersey (Channel Islands). Absent from Great Britain.

Habitat: As for S. araneus. On Jersey, S. coronatus is found in coastal habitats of sand dunes, heath and scrub as well as inland in deciduous woodland, hedgerows and gardens (Godfrey, 1978).

Ecology and behaviour: Similar to S. araneus.

Greater stripe-backed shrew (Sorex cylindricauda) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex cylindricauda Milne-Edwards 1872.

IUCN Category of Threat: Endangered (BI and 2c).

Distribution: This species has only been recorded from Baoxing, North Sichuan, China at an altitude of about 3000m.

Habitat: Montane forest

Large-toothed Siberian shrew (Sorex daphaenodon) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex daphaenodon Thomas 1907.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: Siberia from just east of the Urals to the river Kolyma. Also Kamchatka and the islands of Sakhalin and Paramushir (North Kuriles); northern Mongolia, Manchuria and inner Mongolia (Wang, 1959).

Habitat: Coniferous forest and tundra.


Sorex excelsus - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex excelsus Allen 1923. Considered conspecific with S. asper by Corbet (1978), but see Hoffmann (1987).

IUCN Category of Threat: Data Deficient.

Distribution: This species occurs in Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces, China, and possibly Nepal.

Habitat: The preferred habitat of this species is not known.

Slender shrew (Sorex gracillimus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex minutus gracillimus Thomas 1907. Previously treated as a subspecies of S. minutus, but is given specific rank by all Russian authors because of clear differences.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: A small shrew with a relatively short tail: head and body measure 49-58mm, tail length if from 40-46mm.

Distribution: Siberia from the southern shore of the sea of Okhotsk to North Korea and probably Manchuria; the islands of Sakhalin, Shantar, Hokkaido and some of the Kuriles (Corbet, 1978). Common in northern and eastern parts of Hokkaido (Abe, pers. comm.).

Habitat: This species occupies a wide range of habitats, from grassland to forest (Abe, pers. comm.).

Ecology and behaviour: The behaviour and precise habitat requirements of this species are poorly known.

Iberian shrew (Sorex granarius) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex araneus granarius Miller 1910. Previously included in S. caecutiens (Ellerman and Morrison-Scott, 1951) but Hausser et al., (1975) have demonstrated that its karyotype distinguishes it from S. araneus and S. caecutiens, and that it is also recognisable by its short skull.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Similar in appearance to S. araneus, but slightly smaller and with the muzzle rather short and broader. Cannot be readily identified without chromosomal examination.

Distribution: This species has a limited distribution in the mountains of northern Portugal and Central Spain. It is likely that there is no contact zone with either S. araneus or S. coronatus.

Habitat: Possibly similar to S. araneus.

Ecology and behaviour: Similar to S. araneus.

Azumi shrew (Sorex hosonoi) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex hosonoi Imaizumi 1954.

IUCN Category of Threat: Vulnerable (Bl and 2c).

Description: This is a larger and longer-tailed relative of S. minutissimus. Head and body length measure from 54-66mm, with a tail length of 40-5lmm.

Distribution: This species is only found as relict patchy populations in montane areas of Central Honshu, Japan.

Habitat: Montane habitat.

Ecology and behaviour: No information available on the behaviour of this species.

Even-toothed shrew (Sorex isodon) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex isodon Turov 1924. Considered conspecific with S. sinalis by Corbet (1978), but see Hoffmann (1987).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: A large species with a drab coloured underside, lighter than the dorsal coloration. A wide brain case and narrow rostrum are often distinguishing features.

Distribution: South-east Norway and Finland through Siberia to the Pacific coast; Kamchatka; Sakhalin Island; Kurile Islands; probably also north-east China and Korea (Hutterer, 1993).

Koziov's shrew (Sorex kozlovi) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex kozlovi Stroganov 1952.

IUCN Category of Threat: Critically Endangered (Bl and 2c).

Distribution: This species is only known from the type locality at Dze-Chyu (Zi Qu) River (Tibet), a tributary of the Mekong River.

Habitat: The preferred habitat of this species is not known.

Paramushir shrew (Sorex leucogaster) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex leucogaster Kuroda 1933. Formerly placed in S. cinerus or S. gracillimus (Corbet, 1978), but see Pavlinov and Rossolimo (1987); includes S. beringianus Yudin 1967.

IUCN Category of Threat: Vulnerable (BI and 2c).

Distribution: This species is probably confined to Paramushir Island, south of the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia).

Habitat: The preferred habitat of this species is not known.

Least shrew (Sorex minutissimus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex minutissimus Zimmermann 1780.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: This species is recognisable by its diminutive size (1.6-2.5g - comparable to Suncus etruscus, although their ranges are separate).

Distribution: From Norway, Sweden and Estonia to East Siberia, Mongolia, China and South Korea. Small populations occur on Hokkaido (Abe, pers. comm.). It is also found on the island of Sakhalin. This species has not been recorded from many sites and is probably more widely distributed than realised.

Habitat: Wet coniferous forest; edge of moors and shrublands. This species is widespread in the Palaearctic taiga zone.

Ecology and behaviour: Little is known of the behaviour or ecology of this species.

Eurasian pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex minutus Linnaeus 1766.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Distinguished from S. araneus by its much smaller size (head and body length 40-60mm; tail length 32-46mm) and weight (2.4-6.1g). Pygmy shrews are bicoloured in appearance - brown above and with a dull white ventral pelage. They lack the contrasting coloured flanks of S. araneus.

Distribution: This species is found throughout western Europe from Central Spain and the whole of Scandinavia through western Siberia as far as the Yenesei River and Lake Baikal, and south through the mountains of Central Asia, perhaps to Nepal.

Habitat: Often found in the same habitats as S. araneus but able to tolerate sparser ground cover.

Ecology and behaviour: Solitary and aggressive towards others of the same species. Territorial behaviour much as in S. araneus. Territories of immature animals are largely mutually exclusive but strict territoriality is abandoned at sexual maturity, particularly by males as they search for mates. Home range size varies from 520-1860M2, depending on season and habitat. Pygmy shrews are active during day and night, spending more time on the surface than underground, unlike other shrews. As with S. araneus, pygmy shrews generally overwinter as immature animals (at least in Europe), maturing the following March and April and breeding from April to October. Population density ranges from 4-1 l/ha, depending on season and habitat (Churchfield, 1991).

Ussuri shrew (Sorex mirabilis) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex mirabilis Ognev 1937.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: This species has been recorded from the Ussuri region of eastern Siberia, as well as from North Korea and north-eastern China.

Habitat: The preferred habitat of this species is not known.

Kashmir shrew (Sorex planiceps) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex planiceps Miller 191 1. Considered conspecific with S. thibeanus by Dolgov and Hoffmann (1977) and Hoffmann (in press); but see Hutterer (1 979).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: Kashmir (India) and North Pakistan.

Chukotka shrew (Sorex portenkoi) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex portenkoi Stroganov 1956. Considered conspecific with S. cinereus (Yudin, 1972; Okhotina, 1977) or S. ugyunak (Ivanitskaya and Kozlovskii, 1985), but see Zaitsev (1988) and van Zyll de Jong (1991).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: This species has been recorded from northeast Siberia. The type specimen was collected from Koryaksk, North Kamchatka.

Radde's shrew (Sorex raddei) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex raddei Satunin 1895. Includes S. caucasicus Satunin 1913.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: Sorex raddei has been recorded from the Trans-Caucasus and north-eastern Turkey. It is sympatric with S. caucasicus.

Habitat: Damp forest sites on shores of rivers and lakes, covered by dense grassy vegetation (Ognev, 1962).

Flat-skulled shrew (Sorex roboratus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex roboratus Hollister 1913. Hoffmann (1985) showed that S. vir Allen 1914 was a junior synonym.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Uniform colour. S. roboratus varies geographically in size and relative proportions (Hoffmann, 1985). Sorex r. roboratus from the Altai Mountains and the surrounding region is the largest, with a broader, larger skull. Head and body size ranges from 58-80mm, with a tail length of 35-4lmm (Hoffmann, 1985).

Distribution: This species has been recorded from eastern Siberia, west as far as the River Oh and south to the Altai, North Mongolia, Lake Baikal and Vladivostok (Dolgov, 1967).

Habitat: The preferred habitat of this species is not known. The holotype was trapped in dense Pinus cembra forest (Hoffmann, 1985).

Ecology and behaviour: No information available.

Sado shrew (Sorex sadonis) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex sadonis Yoshiyuki and Imaizumi 1986.

IUCN Category of Threat: Endangered (Bl and 2c).

Distribution: Sorex sadonis is only known from Sado Island, Japan.

Appenine shrew (Sorex samniticus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex samniticus Altobello 1926. Provisionally considered a subspecies of S. araneus by Corbet (1978); but separated as distinct by Graf et al., (1979) and Hausser (1990).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Similar to S. araneus, but the tail of S. samniticus is distinctly shorter (usually less than 40mm).

Distribution: This species is only found in Italy, overlapping with S. araneus in the Appenines.

Habitat: This species has been recorded up to an altitude of 1160m where it co-exists with S. araneus, but also occurs on lower ground in the absence of S. araneus.

Caucasian shrew (Sorex satunini) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex satunini Ognev 1922. Formerly called S. caucasicus Satunin, which has been shown to be a junior synonym of S. raddei (Pavlinov and Rossolimo, 1987).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: This species is found in northern Turkey and ranges from the Central Caucasus to the Azov sea.

Habitat: The preferred habitat of this species is not known.


Shinto shrew (Sorex shinto) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex shinto Thomas 1905. Considered conspecific with S. caecutiens by Abe (1 967) and Corbet (1978), but see Pavlinov and Rossolimo (1987) and George (1988).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: Length of body and head 58-69mm; tail very long - 48-50mm. Back a uniform brownish white with a light olive-rust hue. Flanks lighter than back and gradually changing to dull grey-brown on abdomen.

Distribution: This species is known from Honshu, Shikoku and Hokkaido, Japan.


Dusky shrew (Sorex sinalis) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex sinalis Thomas 1912. Considered conspecific with S. isodon by Corbet (1978); but see Hoffmann (1987).

IUCN Category of Threat: Vulnerable (BI and 2c).

Description: Similar in size to S. araneus, this species is more uniform in colour between dorsal and ventral surfaces and also more grey (see also Hoffmann, 1987). Long tail (55mm) in relation to body length (70mm).

Distribution: Known only from the mountains of westcentral China; type specimens collected south-east of Fengsiangfu, Shaanxi and southern Gansu.

Habitat: Mainly moist montane forest.



Tibetan shrew (Sorex thibetanus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex thibetanus Kastchenko 1905. Thought to include S. buchariensis, S. kozlovi and S. planiceps by Dolgov and Hoffmann (1987) and Hoffmann (in press); but see Hutterer (1979, 1993).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: This species has been recorded from the Himalayas and north-east Tibet.



Tundra shrew (Sorex tundrensis) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex tundrensis Merriam 1900. This species was formerly considered as conspecific with S. arcticus; but see Youngman (1975) and Junge et al., (1983).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subeategory Least Concern).

Description: Similarin external appearance to S. araneus. See Junge et al., (loc.cit.) for detailed discussion.

Distribution: This species is found throughout Siberia (in both taiga and tundra ecosystems) from the Urals to Vladivostok and Anadyr. It is also found in North America from Alaska to the Yukon Territory. It is restricted to a northern distribution, the limits of which are far from clear.

Habitat: The preferred habitat of this species is mixed ground vegetation in well-drained patches of forest and tundra.

Ecology and behaviour: Little information exists on this species in Eurasia. In Canada, data indicate a high reproductive potential, almost certainly an adaptation to Arctic conditions (van Zyll de Jong, 1983). Insects, earthworms and floral parts of small grasses have been identified from the digestive tracts of specimens from Alaska (Quay, 1951).



Long-clawed shrew (Sorex unguiculatus) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex unguiculatus Dobson 1890.

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Description: A relatively large shrew with a head and body length of 54-97mm and a tail length of 40-53mm. Its feet and claws are also large.

Distribution: This species has been recorded along the Pacific coastline of Siberia from Viadivostok to the Amur, as well as from the islands of Sakhalin and Hokkaido.

Habitat: This shrew occurs in a wide range of habitats, ranging from wet grasslands to montane forests. It is most common in grasslands and areas of shrub.

Ecology and behaviour: Semi-fossorial in habit, feeding mainly on insects and small earthworms (Abe, 1967; Abe, pers. comm.). Solitary and territorial, apart from adult males during the breeding season. Active during day and night. A female produces 3-7 young from April to September. A maximum life span of 18 months has been recorded for a free-living shrew from Hokkaido (Abe, 1967).

Ukrainian shrew (Sorex volnuchini) - Return to Top of Page | Table of contents

Taxonomy: Sorex volnuchini Ognev 1922. Considered a subspecies of S. minutus by Corbet (1978), but see Kozlovskii (1973) and Sokolov and Tembotov (1989).

IUCN Category of Threat: Lower Risk (subcategory Least Concern).

Distribution: South Ukraine and Caucasus; possibly Turkey and North Iran.





CITATION:
IUCN. 1995. Eurasian Insectivores and Tree Shrews - Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. (Compiled by Stone, R. David, IUCN/SSC Insectivore, Tree Shrew and Elephant Shrew Specialist Group). IUCN, Gland, Switzerland. vii + 164 pp. ISBN 2-8317-0062-0


Online version: http://members.vienna.at/shrew/itsesAP95-cover.html

Copyright © 1995 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources


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